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Saturday, 6 May 2017

Must read: the one minute workout by Martin Gibala!

Finally one compelling book, backed by science and research and personal experiments, which explains why HIIT is so potent.
More interestingly, Martin Gibala gives examples of HIIT training, with clear explanations.
For people who are looking for time efficiency for their training, proven results and easy to follow protocols, this is a must read!


https://www.amazon.com/One-Minute-Workout-Science-Smarter-Shorter/dp/0399183663



Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Back to VO2MAX:60 thanks to Tabata!

Vo2Max is "the maximum or optimum rate at which the heart, lungs, and muscles can effectively use oxygen during exercise, used as a way of measuring a person's individual aerobic capacity."

"VO2max is a valid index measuring the limits of the cardiorespiratory systems' ability to transport oxygen from the air to the tissues at a given level of physical conditioning and oxygen availability." (link

It is an important indicator of your level of fitness and expected level of performance, albeit not the only one of course and more or less important depending on your favorite sport and distance.

Your VO2max decreases when you are aging, but if you train regularly and with intensity (think Tabata and HIIT) you can slow down the process.

Here is an example of ratings (link):



Age (years)
rating 18-25 26-35 36-45 46-55 56-65 65+
excellent > 60 > 56 > 51 > 45 > 41 > 37
good 52-60 49-56 43-51 39-45 36-41 33-37
above average 47-51 43-48 39-42 36-38 32-35 29-32
average 42-46 40-42 35-38 32-35 30-31 26-28
below average 37-41 35-39 31-34 29-31 26-29 22-25
poor 30-36 30-34 26-30 25-28 22-25 20-21
very poor < 30 < 30 < 26 < 25 < 22 < 20

To measure my VO2max, I'm testing myself regularly with Cooper test (12mn running) or using my cardio Polar. Results work well for me. At least it gives you a trend (eg you can compare the numbers).

When I was training for Triathlon and 70.3 distance Ironman, I could have a regimen of swimming / cycling / running up to 12-14h per week. During this period, my VO2Max was always between 58-60.
Whilst changing job, traveling a lot, and most importantly becoming a father of a wonderful little boy, time for training has shortened dramatically. 
I've also give up on the bike for a while, thus making harder to build the "base" endurance. My VO2max went south in the 55 area (which is still considered a good level for >40 years old).
Recently, I've increased intensity to my regimen, I've added frequency of Tabata training and incorporated back to back sessions (eg 1 Tabata 4 minutes, 1 minute rest, 1 other Tabata 4 minutes).
After a couple of (intense) weeks of training, coupled with a diet (aging process has also its effects!), I'm back now to a VO2 max of 60 at 42 years old next month. More details later :-) 








Thursday, 19 January 2017

Actor Pierre Png loves ballet and unicycling

Real people are using Tabata for real results!

Extract:
"Q What do you do to keep fit?
A I go for two-hour ballet classes twice a week, do tabata workouts and swim. Tabata training is a high-intensity interval training workout that features four- minute-long exercises.
When I swim, I usually do a few sets, starting with six laps and finishing with a set of 10 laps. Between the sets, I will do 20 push-ups. Due to my working hours, I usually exercise at night. I do it to burn excess energy and also because I feel it completes my day."

Full article : link 

 

Need for speed: can you get fit in 15 minutes?

Link:

https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/need-speed-can-get-fit-15-minutes/



Super-quick fitness classes are all the rage among the time-poor, but it’s not an easy short cut – every second counts if you want to see results

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/need-speed-can-get-fit-15-minutes/

Super-quick fitness classes are all the rage among the time-poor, but it’s not an easy short cut – every second counts if you want to see results “I don’t have time” is one of the top excuses for not exercising, and usually why fitness-related new-year resolutions fail before the month is out. But with more gyms introducing super-short lunchtime classes and apps such as The 7-Minute Workout, it seems that this excuse is no longer valid. The idea of getting fit in less time than it takes to shower is certainly an attractive one, but how valid is it? And if seven-minute sessions are all we need, what the hell are all those marathon gym-goers up to? It turns out that even seven minutes may be a bit too generous. A study published last year in the journal PLOS One found that 60 seconds of all-out exercise may have the same health benefits for your heart, muscles and respiratory system as 45 minutes of more typical, continuous exercise over three months. The catch? All out really means all out: you have to push yourself to your limits for that one minute. Tabata This isn’t the first study to alight on the notion of super-charging your workout. Tabata training is the concept of training at different levels of intensity to maximise results. Developed by Professor Izumi Tabata as part of a Japanese study of speed-skaters in 1996, the regime involves 20 seconds of ultra-intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of rest over eight cycles (four minutes). It is just one type of “high-intensity interval training”, or HIIT. These intervals of high-octane anaerobic exercise with recovery in between typically bring about faster glucose metabolism (calorie burning), and improved fitness levels. HIIT’s time-intensive nature has made it popular with fitness gurus like the Body Coach, Joe Wicks, whose HIIT home workout has had more than two million views on YouTube. “The key to having an effective workout in a short space of time is all about getting the intensity, exercise selection and the programming right,” says Matt Bolam, a personal trainer at the gym chain Speedflex

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/need-speed-can-get-fit-15-minutes/
Super-quick fitness classes are all the rage among the time-poor, but it’s not an easy short cut – every second counts if you want to see results “I don’t have time” is one of the top excuses for not exercising, and usually why fitness-related new-year resolutions fail before the month is out. But with more gyms introducing super-short lunchtime classes and apps such as The 7-Minute Workout, it seems that this excuse is no longer valid. The idea of getting fit in less time than it takes to shower is certainly an attractive one, but how valid is it? And if seven-minute sessions are all we need, what the hell are all those marathon gym-goers up to? It turns out that even seven minutes may be a bit too generous. A study published last year in the journal PLOS One found that 60 seconds of all-out exercise may have the same health benefits for your heart, muscles and respiratory system as 45 minutes of more typical, continuous exercise over three months. The catch? All out really means all out: you have to push yourself to your limits for that one minute. Tabata This isn’t the first study to alight on the notion of super-charging your workout. Tabata training is the concept of training at different levels of intensity to maximise results. Developed by Professor Izumi Tabata as part of a Japanese study of speed-skaters in 1996, the regime involves 20 seconds of ultra-intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of rest over eight cycles (four minutes). It is just one type of “high-intensity interval training”, or HIIT. These intervals of high-octane anaerobic exercise with recovery in between typically bring about faster glucose metabolism (calorie burning), and improved fitness levels. HIIT’s time-intensive nature has made it popular with fitness gurus like the Body Coach, Joe Wicks, whose HIIT home workout has had more than two million views on YouTube. “The key to having an effective workout in a short space of time is all about getting the intensity, exercise selection and the programming right,” says Matt Bolam, a personal trainer at the gym chain Speedflex

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/need-speed-can-get-fit-15-minutes/
Super-quick fitness classes are all the rage among the time-poor, but it’s not an easy short cut – every second counts if you want to see results “I don’t have time” is one of the top excuses for not exercising, and usually why fitness-related new-year resolutions fail before the month is out. But with more gyms introducing super-short lunchtime classes and apps such as The 7-Minute Workout, it seems that this excuse is no longer valid. The idea of getting fit in less time than it takes to shower is certainly an attractive one, but how valid is it? And if seven-minute sessions are all we need, what the hell are all those marathon gym-goers up to? It turns out that even seven minutes may be a bit too generous. A study published last year in the journal PLOS One found that 60 seconds of all-out exercise may have the same health benefits for your heart, muscles and respiratory system as 45 minutes of more typical, continuous exercise over three months. The catch? All out really means all out: you have to push yourself to your limits for that one minute. Tabata This isn’t the first study to alight on the notion of super-charging your workout. Tabata training is the concept of training at different levels of intensity to maximise results. Developed by Professor Izumi Tabata as part of a Japanese study of speed-skaters in 1996, the regime involves 20 seconds of ultra-intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of rest over eight cycles (four minutes). It is just one type of “high-intensity interval training”, or HIIT. These intervals of high-octane anaerobic exercise with recovery in between typically bring about faster glucose metabolism (calorie burning), and improved fitness levels. HIIT’s time-intensive nature has made it popular with fitness gurus like the Body Coach, Joe Wicks, whose HIIT home workout has had more than two million views on YouTube. “The key to having an effective workout in a short space of time is all about getting the intensity, exercise selection and the programming right,” says Matt Bolam, a personal trainer at the gym chain Speedflex

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/need-speed-can-get-fit-15-minutes/
Super-quick fitness classes are all the rage among the time-poor, but it’s not an easy short cut – every second counts if you want to see results “I don’t have time” is one of the top excuses for not exercising, and usually why fitness-related new-year resolutions fail before the month is out. But with more gyms introducing super-short lunchtime classes and apps such as The 7-Minute Workout, it seems that this excuse is no longer valid. The idea of getting fit in less time than it takes to shower is certainly an attractive one, but how valid is it? And if seven-minute sessions are all we need, what the hell are all those marathon gym-goers up to? It turns out that even seven minutes may be a bit too generous. A study published last year in the journal PLOS One found that 60 seconds of all-out exercise may have the same health benefits for your heart, muscles and respiratory system as 45 minutes of more typical, continuous exercise over three months. The catch? All out really means all out: you have to push yourself to your limits for that one minute. Tabata This isn’t the first study to alight on the notion of super-charging your workout. Tabata training is the concept of training at different levels of intensity to maximise results. Developed by Professor Izumi Tabata as part of a Japanese study of speed-skaters in 1996, the regime involves 20 seconds of ultra-intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of rest over eight cycles (four minutes). It is just one type of “high-intensity interval training”, or HIIT. These intervals of high-octane anaerobic exercise with recovery in between typically bring about faster glucose metabolism (calorie burning), and improved fitness levels. HIIT’s time-intensive nature has made it popular with fitness gurus like the Body Coach, Joe Wicks, whose HIIT home workout has had more than two million views on YouTube. “The key to having an effective workout in a short space of time is all about getting the intensity, exercise selection and the programming right,” says Matt Bolam, a personal trainer at the gym chain Speedflex

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/need-speed-can-get-fit-15-minutes/

Saturday, 12 November 2016

High intensity interval training is quick and effective

Extract:

"HIIT is an efficient way to push the body and the heart rate in a very short amount of time.
But HIIT has to be done in a very specific way: All out.
Think of running from the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park kind of effort.
"You would have to push yourself to the extreme for that one minute," Hall said. "You're pushing yourself to like, 'I can barely do any more.' "
One of the more well-known examples of HIIT is Tabata. It's real simple: 20 seconds of all-out work in an exercise, followed by 10 seconds of rest, for eight rounds. It sounds like nothing, right? - 4 minutes - until you do it.
An example would be to do burpees and speed skaters for 20 seconds, alternating between the two, with 10-second rests in between. If you go as fast as possible and do the full range of motion (not half jumps), you'll be tired and your heart rate will be high.
Other intervals might be for 30 seconds or 45 seconds followed by a 15-second rest.
If you start hearing someone talk about 60- or 90-second HIIT intervals, or if you try to do them and see the effort fall off, it's time to question if that is HIIT training. It's still good work, of course - but probably not HIIT.
"I don't know if people can sustain that type of intensity for 90 seconds - that's really long," Hall said. "I'm not sure if you can get to your max and hold that for 90 seconds. You want to feel like you can barely do any more, not that you're plodding along."

Full article: link


Thursday, 3 November 2016

What Exactly Is HIIT—And How Can You Tell If You’re Actually Doing It?

Extract :

If you work out, or if you talk to people who work out, you're most definitely familiar with high-intensity interval training (HIIT), and you probably associate it with sweating, panting, and burpees—lots of burpees. It's intense, you do various moves at intervals, and it's training. Name says it all, right?

Well, actually it doesn't. There's a lot more to HIIT than its name alone suggests. We're going to help you read between the letters. Here, fitness pros share the must-know HIIT facts so you can torch calories, burn fat, and build muscle effectively.
Intensity is key—obviously—which means you really have to work.

HIIT is a cardio session arranged as short bursts of very hard work. The whole point of high-intensity training is to kick up the intensity of your cardio. In order to qualify as true HIIT, you’ll need to push yourself to the max during every set. That’s why they’re short—anywhere from 20 to 90 seconds, typically. It’s the opposite of going for a long run where you ration your energy in order to sustain the activity for longer.

Numerous studies have shown that working your hardest is key when it comes to boosting endurance, increasing metabolism, regulating insulin levels, and losing body fat. “All exercise helps burn fat by burning calories,” says fitness expert and celebrity trainer Rob Sulaver. But, he adds, “more intense exercise burns more fat,” and that's part of the reason HIIT is so popular.

And compared to many other cardio workouts, HIIT can be a more effective way of getting shredded, Sulaver explains. HIIT routines that involve bodyweight work (e.g. push-ups) or added weight, such as kettlebells, medicine balls, or dumbbells, will tone your muscles while spiking your heart rate. “HIIT is effective on multiple fronts. It’ll improve your endurance, it will complement your strength development, and it’ll help you get shredded,” he says.

Full Article : link




The Quick and Effective Workout That Burns an Insane Amount of Fat


Extract

If you’re in the market for a new workout, you may want to try the Tabata workout (like we need another type of exercise to worry about!). A celebrity favorite that falls into the high-intensity interval training (HIIT) category, the quick yet effective workout, which hails from Japan, is also said by many to be one of the hardest they’ve ever done, simply because it involves going all out for short bursts of time.

Like any other type of HIIT exercise, New York trainer Terrence Walcott says you’re expected to complete a work set at your maximum ability followed by a rest set, only to complete a work set with an intensity as strenuous as the previous set.

New York trainer Trevor Swaine describes it like pushing your body to the point of near failure and only give it seconds to recover. “You may feel fatigue and exhaustation with a Tabata workout, which is common, but there’s also a great release of endorphins at the end of the workout.” And, in terms of the results, you can expect to see your metabolism kicked into high gear (not just during the day or training, but for the next day, too) and to break through mental and physical plateaus.

Full article: link


Monday, 5 September 2016

We know intervals can hurt, but here’s why they may be worthwhile

Extracts:
"High-intensity interval training can enhance fitness, improve health and even aid recovery from heart disease, according to a growing body of compelling evidence. But, experts caution, intervals should not replace moderate exercise completely. Instead, the two types of activity can complement each other, offering more opportunities for getting fit and staying motivated."

“No exercise is bad, and some exercise, whatever it is, is better than none,” de Heer says. “Aerobic exercise has all kinds of benefits. Intervals are even better. That’s my summary.”
"In one of the latest studies to compare intervals with less-grueling but more time-consuming exercise, Gibala and colleagues put nine sedentary men through three 10-minute interval sessions per week. After a warm-up and before a cool-down, the workout incorporated three all-out sprints on an exercise bike lasting just
20 seconds, with two minutes of easier cycling in between. Another group did 45 minutes of steady cycling at about 70 percent of their maximum heart rate. After 12 weeks, the team reported this spring, both groups had improved equally on measures of heart health and fitness, even though the interval group exercised for 30 minutes a week compared with the other group’s 135 minutes."

Full article: link